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Kali Filippino main styles

Kali / Eskrima / Escrima / Arnis stylesPhilippine Kali is a martial arts and fighting system that has its origins in the Philippines, in the area of Southeast Asia.

There are many styles of Kali, each of which can be characterized by a number of specific techniques and principles of combat.

Filipino Kali is a very complete and varied martial art that offers a wide range of fighting styles and techniques.

Each style has its own history, philosophy and teaching methodology, and each can be suitable for different training objectives.

Choosing the right style depends on personal preferences, individual skills and training objectives and also local availability in your country or city, unless you, like I, for example, are willing to move and travel.

In summary, the vastness and variety of Filipino Kali styles offers many opportunities to learn and develop one’s martial skills.

Choosing the right style depends on personal preferences, training goals and individual characteristics. Regardless of the style chosen, Filipino Kali offers a great opportunity to develop self-defense skills, agility, strength, coordination and discipline.

Whatever martial art or combat sport I practice, my advice is to start practicing Kali in parallel because it is a turbo for martial arts any other art, system, sports practice.

I’m going to insert a brief description of the style but for those who are not a practitioner of kali I insert the terminologies used in kali to help you understand better.

Eskrima Weapons

Terminology in Filipino escrima and kali.

  • Abanico: means fan blow, and consists of a double or triple blow carried out with a rotation of the wrist of about 18 ° keeping the elbow motionless.
  • Abecedario: set of basic exercises, attacks and defenses performed with a single stick
  • Arnis de mano: or scheme with Bare Hands
  • Baraw: generic term for a knife
  • Cadena de Mano: fight with bare hands with the principles of escrima. See the executive concepts of ubad-lubad.
  • Deficiency: concept of shadow boxing – Pulling a set of techniques to empty by making them flow dynamically without a fixed scheme
  • Cinco Teros : shooting technique based on the 5 angles of attack.
  • Short hand: shots at close range.
  • Crossada: cross the blows with the stick or knife. Method widely used in the use of the knife in combat.
  • Dulo Dulo: see the Tabak Malik – small pocket stick – Ancient version of the modern Koga SD1 and SD2.
  • Dumog or Buno: term that identifies the Philippine wrestling in general, practiced both standing and on the ground.
  • Espada y Daga: sword and knife or stick and knife.
  • Eskrimador: stick fighter
  • Foot Work: set of techniques of moving with the legs during combat.
  • Gunting: technique of breaking the opponent’s limbs both in defense and in attack. Also known by the term “breaking the tooth of the snake“.
  • Karambit: Filipino characteristic knife with curved hook blade.
  • Wide Hand: strike at long distance.
  • Lobtik: cut shot, which emphasizes the dynamics of a cutting weapon.
  • Olisi: short bamboo stick for the practice of escrima.
  • Ordabis : shot with the back of the hand type BackFist.
  • Payong: umbrella shot.
  • Panantukan : Philippine boxing usually practiced without gloves.
  • Pananjakman or Sikaran/Panadiakan : kicking techniques designed to inflict pain or reduce the mobility of the opponent by breaking the base.
  • Pangamot: bare-handed defense.
  • Punyo: shot that uses the uncovered part of the stick handle.
  • Redondo: circular shot.
  • SakSak: tip shot, in the case of the stick it is carried in two ways with a fair amount of force.
  • Sinawali: sequences of technical exercises on the use of the double stick – Typical figure of 8 with 2 sticks.
  • Tabak Malik : small pocket stick slightly longer than the width of the palm of a practitioner’s hand – also called Dulo Dulo or Pocketstick in English.
  • Tabi tabi: lateral movement.
  • Trapping: various types of techniques used in melee and based on entrapments, percussion blows, joint levers, imbalances and projections.
  • Ubad-lubad (tying and untying the knot): technical exercise with which develops sensitivity, it is a sort of continuous circular movement linked (the hubud lubud was also defined by the Spaniards “Cadena de Mano”).
  • Witik: whipped shot.
  • Laptik: power shot carried with the body.

Kali Stick Bag

Olisi or Single Stick

It is the main weapon of many Escrima/Kali styles and for some it is even the only weapon studied. The stick is usually made of Bamboo, Rattan or other harder woods such as Kamagong, Yakal. or the Mactan , hardened with fire, of length ranging from 55 to 70 cm and a diameter between 2 and 3 cm, depending on the style practiced. It is also called in the Philippines Olisi in Cebuano or Baston in Visayan.

This weapon of easy availability in everyday life is extremely versatile and its principles of use can be safely transferred not only in cutting weapons but also in use for self-defense with common objects such as: pens, house keys, umbrellas, rolled newspapers, mobile phones etc. You can also use two sticks at the same time “Double Olisi“, giving life to one of the most popular methods and exercises of handling with the two sticks known as “Sinawali“, developed by the Pampangueno tribe.

Long Stick or Sibat (Long Pole or Lancia)

Although this weapon does not seem to belong to the Filipino martial landscape, it is used with a two-handed grip applying the same principles and techniques as the shots used with the single short stick.

In some Filipino styles the movements of the long stick are called “Amara”.

The long stick, therefore, can easily be used to perform projection techniques with levers on the legs, figures 8, lunges and whipping attacks of all kinds and trajectories.

Bantay Kamay (Alive Hand or Living Hand)

In the Escrima the term Bantay Kamay is intended to define the unarmed limb (or empty hand) also called “Alive Hand”.

This hand is not placed behind as in traditional Spanish, French or Italian fencing, but collaborates with the armed hand by actively operating in the combat phase, for example protecting its vital points, disarming by controlling or monitoring the opponent’s limbs, attacking or parrying, immobilizing or doing joint levers.

Bantay Kamay

Espada y Daga

Methodology of clear Spanish origins that left an indelible mark on the Philippine martial arts. A system widely used in classic Spanish fencing, the ” Espada y Daga” uses the effectiveness of the stockpiles of a short weapon by combining them with those of a long-cutting weapon.

In Spain the use of the “Spada y Daga” will remain in vogue (even in duels) until the mid-eighteenth century.

The Filipino masters then adapted this technique to their art by developing their own method of fighting at medium and long distances using stick and knife (olisi and baraw) instead of knife and sword.

This method combining stick and knife or dagger, allows you to apply melee techniques such as levers and projections with both weapons, techniques that would not be applicable if you adopted the sword instead of the stick.

They are trained by various exercises, different techniques and methods to pass from a long, medium or short distance.

The swords used of different shapes and types, change name depending on the region of origin. We remember below the best known which are: the Kampilan (double tip), the Bolo and the Machete, the Sundang (very similar to a Kriss), the Barong (flat blade about 70 cm long a little pot-bellied in the center) and finally the Pinuti (with a blade).

Espada Y Daga

Panantukan (or Philippine Boxing)

The Panantukan o Boxe Filippina draws its own technique and combat strategy directly from the use of the knife, adopting to hit the fingertips, forearms, elbows, punches, blows with the shoulders and head a bit as it is also in Jeet Kune Do and Wing Tsun but with a more circular and tactical approach.

The shots are carried with speed and explosiveness and being all chained, they aim to hit the opponent not only on the vital points such as genitals, eyes, throat, but also destroying the limbs, the various nerve points and the muscular tissues of the body ( Gunting techniques), thus inducing the aggressor to not be able to continue the fight and then finish it with a final blow.

The exceptional work of Footwoork extrapolated from the use of the knife together with the use of trapping and punching, make the Filipino Panantukan a very effective boxing method in self-defense situations.

Kali Filippino main styles Fighting Tips - Street Fight Mentality & Fight Sport

Pananjakman – Sikaran or Panadiakan (the Philippine Art of Kicking)

In Pananjakman acrobatic kicks are absolutely never used as in other martial arts.

All football techniques are applied in order to destroy the base of your opponent by reducing their mobility, inflicting pain, fracturing the bones of the legs or injuring their joints.

The kicks of the Pananjakman or Sikaran follow all trajectories: frontal, lateral, circular hook and hit thighs, genitals, knees and tibiae and are carried with the heel, the tip of the foot, or tibia.

The strategy is always to pull them below the level of the belt, so never in the face, at most on the ribs if the opponent has lowered in level.

Pananjakman and Panantukan together, constitute a complete system born and used in a particular way for survival therefore in self-defense.

Cadena de mano

The ancient Filipino masters called ” Hubud Lubud”, “Tie and Untie the Knot” one of the most important training methods of their martial art, around which the entire bare-handed combat system of the Escrima revolves.

The Hubud Lubud also called by the Spaniards ” Cadena de Mano” consists of a series of exercises performed in absolute softness and fluidity carried out in pairs, designed to develop sensitivity and dexterity in the practitioner who acquires greater control of their movements working in symbiosis with their partner.

The intent is to create a continuity in the movement then the famous Cadena de Mano trying to adapt to the rhythm of the opponent in front of you, using a set of techniques all different from each other ranging from common shots to parries, gunting to trapping arriving at a perfect synchrony, up to achieve the purpose of developing resistance, glance and a remarkable ability to concatenate the movements used.

Dumog or Buno

The term Dumog identifies precisely that sector of the Philippine martial art that concerns the fight or grappling.

There are two types of specialties in Philippine wrestling, the best known being the “Agaw patid Buno”, which includes all standing fighting techniques, imbalances, projections and neck manipulation techniques and then the “Musang Dumog which is the art of ground combat, in which levers, strangulations and blows are adopted to subdue the opponent.

Both systems of struggle can be combined together or if necessary studied separately.

Dumog, New100145

Here is a list of some of the main styles of Filipino Kali:

They have not been inserted in order of importance or personal taste so as not to influence any choice but if you want to know my opinion or the styles I know and practice write me an email.

1. Eskrima – one of the oldest and most widespread styles of Kali, also known as Arnis or Garrote.

2. Kali – a style that focuses on the use of weapons, but also includes hand-to-hand combat techniques.

3. Panantukan – a bare-handed combat system that focuses on the use of fists, elbows, knees and heads.

4. Silat – a style of Kali that has origins in Indonesia, but which was influenced by Filipino culture.

5. Modern Arnis – a Kali system that focuses on the use of sticks and which was developed by Remy Presas in the 60s.

6. Balintawak – a style of Kali that focuses on short-range combat with short sticks.

7. Lapunti Arnis de Abanico – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and that was developed by Felimon E. Caburnay.

8. Doce Pares – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons and that was developed in the Philippines.

9. Pekiti-Tirsia Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons and that was developed by Leo T. Gaje Jr.

10. Inosanto Kali – a style of Kali that was developed by Dan Inosanto and which includes bare-handed, weapon and multi-weapon fighting techniques.

11. Lameco Eskrima – a style of Kali that was developed by Edgar Sulite and which focuses on the use of weapons.

12. Sayoc Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons.

13. Kali Sikaran – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of kicks, punches and throws.

14. Kombatan – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons and that was developed by Ernesto Presas.

15. Modern Arnis Manila – a style of Kali that was developed by Rodel Dagooc and which focuses on the use of sticks.

16. Lightning Scientific Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons.

17. Dekiti Tirsia Siradas – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other weapons.

18. Sagasa Kickboxing – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of kicks and punches.

19. Filipino Combat Systems – a style of Kali that incorporates bare-handed and weaponized combat techniques.

20. Bakbakan International – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons and has a strong emphasis on competition.

21. Balintawak International – an international version of the Balintawak style, which was developed to spread the martial art around the world.

22. Kali Ilustrisimo – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons, with special emphasis on short-range combat.

23. Original Filipino Tapado – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of long sticks and that was developed in the province of Negros Occidental.

24. Visayan Style Short Kadena – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and that was developed in the Visayas region.

25. Kali Majapahit – a style of Kali that has influences of Southeast Asian martial arts, such as Pencak Silat.

26. Serrada Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons.

27. Kalis Ilustrisimo – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of white weapons, such as knives and swords.

28. Bakbakan International – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of white and edged weapons.

29. Kuntaw Kali – a style of Kali that combines bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques.

30. Arjuken – a style of Kali that incorporates techniques of fighting with bare hands and with weapons, including knives, sticks and swords.

31. Kombinasyon – a style of Kali that combines techniques of bare-handed and weapon-based combat.

32. Modern Arnis Federation of the Philippines – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons.

33. Warrior Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons.

34. Kapisanang Mandirigma – an organization that promotes the Philippine martial art through the dissemination of different styles of Kali.

35. Kalahi Custom Blade – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons.

36. Applied Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the application of fighting techniques in real situations.

37. Lightning Combatives – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon fighting techniques, with the aim of preparing students to face real-life situations.

38. Doce Pares Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons, such as knives, sticks and swords.

39. Inosanto Kali – a style of Kali developed by Dan Inosanto, which incorporates fighting techniques from different Philippine martial arts.

40. Pekiti-Tirsia Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons.

41. Binas Dynamic Arnis – a style of Kali that combines bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques.

42. Progressive Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

43. Kali Center – a Kali school offering courses on different variants of Kali, including Modern Arnis, Inosanto Kali and Sayoc Kali.

44. Dacayana Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of weapons and bare-handed fighting techniques.

45. Kali Silat – a style of Kali that incorporates fighting techniques from Pencak Silat, a martial art from Southeast Asia.

46. Sayoc Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons.

47. Balintawak Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons.

48. Lapunti Arnis de Abanico – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

49. Modern Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

50. Cabales Serrada Escrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons.

51. De Campo 1-2-3 Original – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

52. Lameco Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

53. San Miguel Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons.

54. Visayan Style Short Kadena – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons.

55. Abenir Kalis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons.

56. Lightning Scientific Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

57. Tapado – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks of variable length.

58. Serrada Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons.

59. Kombatan – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques.

60. Sikaran – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed fighting techniques, with a focus on football techniques.

61. Marcaida Kali – a style of Kali developed by Tuhon Ray Dionaldo, which incorporates fighting techniques from different Philippine martial arts.

62. Largo Mano Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks of variable length.

63. Kali Sikaran – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, with a focus on football techniques.

64. Pambuan Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

65. Doblete Rapilon – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons.

66. Dagooc Style – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons.

67. Kali Ilustrisimo – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons, using precise and rapid techniques.

68. Abanico Tres Puntas – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons, using close-range combat techniques.

69. Tapi-Tapi – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of disarmament techniques and combat control, with a focus on fluidity and accuracy of movement.

70. Inayan System – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks, knives and other weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

71. Lightning Combatives – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, with a focus on efficiency and speed of movement.

72. Sayaw ng Kamatayan – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques, using fluid and harmonious movements.

73. Pekiti-Tirsia Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

74. Sina Tirsia Wali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons, using techniques of combat at close range.

75. Kalis Ilustrisimo Repeticion Orihinal – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of knives and other white weapons, using precise and rapid techniques.

76. Balintawak Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks, incorporating techniques of bare-handed fighting and grappling.

77. Modern Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

78. Kombatan – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques, with a focus on coordination and efficiency of movement.

79. Doce Pares – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

80. Kuntaw Kali Kruzada – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, incorporating elements of boxing and kickboxing.

81. De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons, using precise and fast techniques.

82. Kali Sikaran – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon fighting techniques, with a focus on fluidity and speed of movement.

83. Serrada Escrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, using techniques of combat at close range.

84. Pambuan Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of short sticks and other weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

85. San Miguel Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, using close-range and medium-length combat techniques.

86. Balangaw Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, incorporating elements of Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

87. Tapado – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of long sticks and other long-distance weapons, using precise and fast techniques.

88. Kali Ilustrisimo – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques, with a focus on fluidity of movement and the ability to adapt to combat situations.

89. Lightning Scientific Arnis – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, using close-range and medium-length combat techniques, with a focus on speed and accuracy of movement.

90. Bakbakan International – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, incorporating elements of boxing and kickboxing, with a focus on strength and power of movement.

91. Derobio Escrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, using smooth, circular movements.

92. Sina Tirsia Wali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, incorporating techniques of bare-handed combat and grappling.

93. Kali DeLeon – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon fighting techniques, incorporating elements of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and grappling, with a focus on fluidity and precision of movement.

94. Philippine Fighting Arts – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques, using circular and fluid movements, with a focus on coordination and balance.

95. Sayoc Kali – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-fighting techniques, with a focus on speed and accuracy of movement, using boxing and kickboxing techniques.

96. Kali Silat – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of bare-handed and weapon-based fighting techniques, incorporating elements of Indonesian Silat and other Southeast Asian martial arts.

97. Lameco Eskrima – a style of Kali that focuses on the use of sticks and other weapons, using combat techniques at close range and medium length, with a focus on coordination and balance.

There are many other styles of Kali, each of which can have its own unique characteristics and traditions. The important thing is to find a style that suits your preferences and training goals.

Main styles of Kali / Eskrima / Arnis in alphabetical order :

  • Abanico
  • Abanico de sunkite
  • Alphabet
  • Abierta
  • Arku tai pa Arnis
  • Arfephil Arnis
  • Arnis Escorpizio
  • Arnis Fernandes
  • Arnis Koredas Obra Hand
  • Arnis Lanada
  • Armis Sidula
  • Arnis Tapado
  • Balintawak Eskrima
  • Balintawak Arnis Cuentada
  • Balintawak Super Cuentada
  • Balintawak Teovel Arnis
  • Balsakan
  • Bantagueno Serrada
  • Bayson style
  • Bdu style
  • Bicolano Arnis
  • Binas dynamic arnis
  • Black Eagle Arnis
  • Bohol Arnis
  • Bultong
  • Cadena de Mano
  • Cebuano – Italy
  • Cinco Tiros Arnis
  • De Campo escrima
  • De Pluma Arnis
  • De Querdas Eskrima
  • Derobio Eskrima
  • Disalon Doblete Rapillon
  • Doce Pares
  • Dos Manos
  • Doublecado
  • Eskrido
  • Etalanium
  • Excalibur system
  • Puerta Fund
  • Giron Arnis
  • Hagibis
  • Herada Bantaqueno
  • Hinaplos arnis
  • Kuntao, New1000
  • Illongo
  • Illustrious Kali
  • Iloko
  • Inayan Eskrima
  • Indagan Escrima
  • Inosanto / Lacoste Kali
  • Lameco Eskrima
  • Lapunti Arnis de Abanico
  • Wide Hand
  • Largada Pesada
  • Largusa/Villabrille kali
  • Lastico
  • Latosa Escrima
  • Slab arnis
  • Lightning Scientific Arnis
  • Literada
  • Mena arnis
  • Modern Arnis
  • Modern hand-hand
  • Modern largos
  • Numerada
  • Pampango
  • Pananandata Marinas
  • Pekiti Tirsia Kali
  • Precia Punialada
  • Rapid Arnis
  • Redondo
  • Repeticion
  • Retirada
  • Rizal Arnis
  • Sayoc Kali
  • Serrada Eskrima
  • You are Pares Arnis
  • Simaron
  • Sinayoup kali
  • Sulite style
  • Sumbrada
  • Sumkeate
  • Talahib
  • Tapado
  • Taosug
  • Tendencia arnis/hilot
  • Tobosa kali escrima
  • Toledo
  • Trisello
  • Vee Arnis
  • Waray
  • Warrior Eskrima

These are just some of the styles of Filipino Kali available but it is already a very complete list but if you practice or teach a style that is not in the list and that you want to make known or deepen write me an email or in the comments under the post.

There are many other regional and custom variations, reflecting the different cultures and traditions of the Philippines.

The main thing is to choose a style of Kali that suits your preferences, abilities and training goals.

Each of these styles has a unique story, philosophy, and fighting techniques.

Filipino Kali is an extremely rich and varied martial art that offers a wide range of fighting styles and techniques.

Choosing the right style depends on personal preferences, training goals and individual characteristics.

Regardless of the style chosen, Filipino Kali is a complete martial art that helps develop self-defense skills, strength, agility, coordination, and discipline.

Filipino Kali is an extremely versatile and stylish martial art, offering multiple opportunities for learning and personal development.

Due to its focus on weapon practice and close-range combat, Kali is an excellent choice for anyone interested in developing self-defense and self-control skills, as well as for those who wish to deepen their knowledge of Filipino culture and tradition.

Filipino Kali is a very rich and varied martial art, with a wide range of styles focusing on different areas of specialization.

12 Areas of Philippine Kali

Thanks to its focus on weapons and its focus on combat at close range,

The Philippine Kali is becoming increasingly popular as a combat and self-defense system, both in the Philippines and around the world.

Each style of Kali has its own peculiarities and areas of specialization, but they all share the same attention to fluidity of movement, precision and speed, as well as the ability to adapt to combat situations.

In addition, many Kali styles incorporate elements of grappling and bare-handed fighting techniques, making it a complete and effective martial arts system for both self-defense and sports competition.

Thanks to its richness and variety, Filipino Kali is one of the most fascinating and interesting martial arts in the world, which continues to grow and evolve every day also thanks to the work of numerous experts and instructors who seek to preserve the traditions and techniques of the martial art, but also to innovate and experiment with new forms of combat, teaching methods and sports competitions.

Also for this reason, when people try Filipino Kali with qualified people and understand its applicability in the real world by spreading its message and Kali is and has become increasingly popular not only among martial arts enthusiasts, but also among law enforcement and armed forces around the world, which use Kali techniques and strategies for self-defense training and for the training of their agents.

Importantly, Filipino Kali is not only a martial art, but also a form of culture and history of the Philippines.

In fact, many of the techniques and weapons used in Kali have ancient roots and were developed by the indigenous peoples of the Philippines.

Therefore, practicing Filipino Kali also means knowing and appreciating the culture and history of the Filipino people.

inosanto-kali

Conclusions

For those interested in practicing Filipino Kali, it is possible to find schools and instructors all over the world but it is essential to practice and learn it with qualified people.

The practice of Kali requires perseverance, dedication and patience, as there are many techniques and skills to be learned.

However, the health and personal safety benefits are numerous, and the practice of Kali can be rewarding and exciting.

In addition, Filipino Kali does not require a particular physical form or age, but can be practiced by anyone, regardless of their abilities and limitations.

Finally, it is important to remember that Filipino Kali is a martial art that requires respect for one’s opponent and oneself, and that it should only be used when necessary.

The practice of Kali should be seen as a tool to improve one’s self-defense and to grow as a person, not as an opportunity to harm others.

In this way, the practice of Filipino Kali can become a real lifestyle, which brings benefits not only on a physical, but also mental and spiritual level.

Stay Tuned!

Street Fight Mentality & Fight Sport

Andrea
Andreahttp://expertfightingtips.com
Con una passione per la difesa personale e gli sport da combattimento, mi distinguo come praticante e fervente cultore e ricercatore sulle metodologie di allenamento e strategie di combattimento. La mia esperienza abbraccia un vasto panorama di discipline: dal dinamismo del Boxing alla precisione del Muay Thai, dalla tecnica del Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu all'energia del Grappling, dal Combat Submission Wrestling (CSW) all'intensità del Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). Non solo insegno, ma vivo la filosofia di queste arti, affinando costantemente metodi e programmi di allenamento che trascendono il convenzionale. La mia essenza si riflette nell'autodifesa: Filipino Martial Arts (FMA), Dirty Boxing, Silat, l'efficacia del Jeet Kune Do & Kali, l'arte della scherma con coltelli e bastoni, e la tattica delle armi da fuoco. Incarno la filosofia "Street Fight Mentality", un approccio senza fronzoli, diretto e strategico, unito a un "State Of Love And Trust" che bilancia l'intensità con la serenità. Oltre al tatami, la mia curiosità e competenza si spingono verso orizzonti diversi: un blogger professionista con la penna sempre pronta, un bassista dal groove inconfondibile e un artigiano del coltello, dove ogni lama è un racconto di tradizione e innovazione. Questa sinfonia di abilità non solo definisce la mia identità professionale, ma dipinge il ritratto di un individuo che nella diversità trova la sua unica e inconfondibile voce e visione. Street Fight Mentality & Fight Sport! Andrea

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